#ICASA2013 Live | The Hub | December 7-11, 2013

Remmy Shawa: Mind the gap to get to zero

Bold Collaboration: The Future of Getting to Zero

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Those of us working in the HIV response know that young people are uniquely vulnerable to new infections. We hear the troubling statistics about risk, especially for young women. For example, young women in sub-Saharan Africa, is 8 times more likely than her male counterpart to be HIV contract HIV. If she is also a sex worker or injecting drug user, she is barred from accessing the information and services that she needs to stay healthy.

Dr. Richard Noamesi Amenyah: Targeting zero through technical support facilities

How to Use the Cupid Female Condom


Joy Lynn Alegarbes, Master Trainer for the CONDOMIZE! Campaign, shows how to use the Cupid female condom.

New strategies reach men who have sex with men with HIV prevention and care services in Ghana

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In Ghana, an FHI 360-implemented project is successfully using new strategies to reach men who have sex with men with vital HIV prevention and care services.

Sydney Hushie: LAP It Up at ICASA

First Lady seeks condom availability to youths

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First Lady Christine Kaseba has called on relevant authorities to make condoms and contraceptives available to adolescents and young people. Read the full article >>

AVAC Urges HIV Prevention Research “Reality Check”

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In a report released today, AVAC calls on funders and researchers to capitalize on lessons learned from a range of recent HIV prevention trials… Read the full article

Scaling up HIV treatment in Africa

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“HIV treatment is a game-changer” was one of the main messages from participants at a key session on Scaling up HIV treatment in Africa: 2015 and beyond… Read the full post >>

ARV Intolerance – A Growing Problem for AIDS Treatment in Africa

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New research suggests that some AIDS patients are developing drug intolerance and severe side effects and will now have to switch to new, more expensive antiretroviral regimens. Read the full article >>.